How Much Does it Cost to Mount a Diamond? (2022 Guide)

Wondering how much it costs to mount a diamond?

You’re in the right place! In this JewelryMarquis.com guide, I’ll answer common questions like:

  • How Much Does it Cost to Mount a Diamond?
  • What is Mounting a Diamond?
  • Where can you have your diamond mounted?
  • Tips About Mounting a Diamond
  • And much more!

How Much Does it Cost to Mount a Diamond?

Though it depends on the type of setting, you can expect to pay anywhere between $50 to $300 to mount a diamond. This does, however, only include the setting for the diamond and not the center stone.

Additionally, if the head on the setting is not the right size for the diamond, they’d actually have to replace it and in the end, will cost you more.

Replacing the head can also vary, with fancy cut stones commanding a higher price, as they are a bit more difficult to handle.

Meanwhile, hard, round stones like diamonds and sapphires are generally hard to damage and so can be set in just 15 minutes. However, softer stones like an opal can be problematic, as there is a much greater risk to the stone.

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Another factor that is taken into account is the carat size. So for diamonds, you can expect to pay around $100 per 1 carat.

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Important Note: It’s your bench’s responsibility to ensure that your diamond is safe and in good condition when it is being set. Make sure to clarify the liability issue with the jeweler before mounting the diamond.

important note how much does it cost to mount a diamond

How Will You Know Your Diamond is Mounted Properly? 

Check #1:

Every prong holding onto the diamond is tight, which means that there are no gaps between the prongs and the diamond.

Check #2:

Ensure that the groove on the prongs has just the right depth, not too shallow and not too deep.

When the groove is too shallow it will not have enough grip on the diamond, even if the prongs are tight. When the grooves are too deep, the prongs become very fragile.

Check #3:

Ensure that the prongs are not pulled too much. The crafter needs to pull out the prongs slightly before placing the diamond to allow it to sit on top.

In some cases, crafters pull the prongs too much over the diamond, making it easy to break or chip the prongs.

Check #4:

Ensure that the prongs are not too small for the diamond. If it is, there won’t be enough material on the tip of the prongs to hold the diamond firmly.

How Long Does it Take to Mount a Diamond?

Again, it depends on the setting, but if it’s just a stock setting, it can take just 15-20 minutes.

On the other hand, if it’s a handmade setting, it can take up to 3-4 months depending on how busy the bench is at the time.

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We recommend going at least a few months before the holiday season to ensure that your stones won’t get stuck into the New Year.

You can ask the store if they have a designer “in-house” that works at the shop. If they do, then it could take significantly less time, and you would be able to check up on the progress more easily.

Most stores send the work outside the store, which contributes to the long waiting times.

What is Mounting a Diamond?

A mounted diamond is a diamond that has already been attached to a setting, so mounting a diamond is simply adding existing diamonds to a predetermined diamond setting.

Before you mount your diamond in a setting, you will need to select a setting first. The process is quite simple. First, the jewelers cut prongs and file them before setting the stone on the jewelry.

If you have a loose diamond, a diamond that has been bought separately from its setting, then you will need to choose a mounting that fits your stone.

Then, the jeweler will tailor the diamond and setting so that the stones are in a straight position and the prongs are lined up diametrically.

Where Can You Have your Diamond Mounted?

There are a large number of diamond retailers that can help you get your diamond mounted, from your local shop to nationwide companies like Jared.

DiamondNexus.com offers such gemstone-setting mounts at $50.

Tips for Having Your Diamond Mounted

Tip #1: Go back to the store where you purchased the diamond/setting

We recommend having the seller set the stone. They will cover you while no one else really will. Some even offer a waive of liability when setting these stones.

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Moreover, some of the reputable, well-known jewelers like JamesAllen.com offer mounting at no charge if both the mourning and stone were bought from their online store.

They also offer ring resizing if you happen to have purchased the diamond ring from them.

Tip #2: Call a few of your local jewelers

Call a few of your local jewelers and tell them what you’re looking for and get some prices. You’ll avoid overpaying as there are quite a few sleazy jewelry salesmen who are looking to get an extra buck or two.

In a couple of instances, I’ve seen quotes range from $35-$150 for the same job! It sounds crazy but that’s the reality. Do be sure to check out their reviews before committing though.

Tip #3: Write down your diamond’s unique ID

Though it’s unlikely to happen, you want to make sure that your diamond is not switched with another when being mounted.

To do this, either take your diamond’s unique ID or its unique fingerprint of inclusions and symmetry.

Tip #4: Ask a lot of questions!

Don’t immediately pick the first jeweler you see. Ask them questions like these to get a better sense of their workmanship and their availability:

  • “What is your delivery time frame?”
  • “How long have you been in the diamond mounting business?
  • “What is your liability policy on your mounting job?”

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